Writing Indian Nations

Filename: writing-indian-nations.pdf
ISBN: 9780807875902
Release Date: 2005-11-16
Number of pages: 384
Author: Maureen Konkle
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

Download and read online Writing Indian Nations in PDF and EPUB In the early years of the republic, the United States government negotiated with Indian nations because it could not afford protracted wars politically, militarily, or economically. Maureen Konkle argues that by depending on treaties, which rest on the equal standing of all signatories, Europeans in North America institutionalized a paradox: the very documents through which they sought to dispossess Native peoples in fact conceded Native autonomy. As the United States used coerced treaties to remove Native peoples from their lands, a group of Cherokee, Pequot, Ojibwe, Tuscarora, and Seneca writers spoke out. With history, polemic, and personal narrative these writers countered widespread misrepresentations about Native peoples' supposedly primitive nature, their inherent inability to form governments, and their impending disappearance. Furthermore, they contended that arguments about racial difference merely justified oppression and dispossession; deriding these arguments as willful attempts to evade the true meanings and implications of the treaties, the writers insisted on recognition of Native peoples' political autonomy and human equality. Konkle demonstrates that these struggles over the meaning of U.S.-Native treaties in the early nineteenth century led to the emergence of the first substantial body of Native writing in English and, as she shows, the effects of the struggle over the political status of Native peoples remain embedded in contemporary scholarship.


Genocide of the Mind

Filename: genocide-of-the-mind.pdf
ISBN: 9780786750313
Release Date: 2009-07-21
Number of pages: 352
Author: MariJo Moore
Publisher: Nation Books

Download and read online Genocide of the Mind in PDF and EPUB After five centuries of Eurocentrism, many people have little idea that Native American tribes still exist, or which traditions belong to what tribes. However over the past decade there has been a rising movement to accurately describe Native cultures and histories. In particular, people have begun to explore the experience of urban Indians—individuals who live in two worlds struggling to preserve traditional Native values within the context of an ever-changing modern society. In Genocide of the Mind, the experience and determination of these people is recorded in a revealing and compelling collection of essays that brings the Native American experience into the twenty-first century. Contributors include: Paula Gunn Allen, Simon Ortiz, Sherman Alexie, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Maurice Kenny, as well as emerging writers from different Indian nations.


Nation to Nation

Filename: nation-to-nation.pdf
ISBN: 9781588344793
Release Date: 2014-09-30
Number of pages: 272
Author: Suzan Shown Harjo
Publisher: Smithsonian Institution

Download and read online Nation to Nation in PDF and EPUB Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indians explores the promises, diplomacy, and betrayals involved in treaties and treaty making between the United States government and Native Nations. One side sought to own the riches of North America and the other struggled to hold on to traditional homelands and ways of life. The book reveals how the ideas of honor, fair dealings, good faith, rule of law, and peaceful relations between nations have been tested and challenged in historical and modern times. The book consistently demonstrates how and why centuries-old treaties remain living, relevant documents for both Natives and non-Natives in the 21st century.


Indian Tribes of Oklahoma

Filename: indian-tribes-of-oklahoma.pdf
ISBN: 9780806184630
Release Date: 2012-03-01
Number of pages: 416
Author: Blue Clark
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

Download and read online Indian Tribes of Oklahoma in PDF and EPUB Oklahoma is home to nearly forty American Indian tribes, and includes the largest Native population of any state. As a result, many Americans think of the state as “Indian Country.” For more than half a century readers have turned to Muriel H. Wright’s A Guide to the Indian Tribes of Oklahoma as the authoritative source for information on the state’s Native peoples. Now Blue Clark, an enrolled member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, has rendered a completely new guide that reflects the drastic transformation of Indian Country in recent years. As a synthesis of current knowledge, this book places the state’s Indians in their contemporary context as no other book has done. Solidly grounded in scholarship and Native oral tradition, it provides general readers the unique story of each tribe, from the Alabama-Quassartes to the Yuchis. Each entry contains a complete statistical and narrative summary of the tribe, encompassing everything from origin tales and archaeological research to contemporary ceremonies and tribal businesses. The entries also include tribal websites and suggested readings, along with photographs depicting prominent tribal personages, visitor sites, and accomplishments.


Firsting and Lasting

Filename: firsting-and-lasting.pdf
ISBN: 9781452915258
Release Date: 2010
Number of pages: 269
Author: Jean M. Obrien
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

Download and read online Firsting and Lasting in PDF and EPUB Across nineteenth-century New England, antiquarians and community leaders wrote hundreds of local histories about the founding and growth of their cities and towns. Ranging from pamphlets to multivolume treatments, these narratives shared a preoccupation with establishing the region as the cradle of an Anglo-Saxon nation and the center of a modern American culture. They also insisted, often in mournful tones, that New England’s original inhabitants, the Indians, had become extinct, even though many Indians still lived in the very towns being chronicled. InFirsting and Lasting, Jean M. O’Brien argues that local histories became a primary means by which European Americans asserted their own modernity while denying it to Indian peoples. Erasing and then memorializing Indian peoples also served a more pragmatic colonial goal: refuting Indian claims to land and rights. Drawing on more than six hundred local histories from Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island written between 1820 and 1880, as well as censuses, monuments, and accounts of historical pageants and commemorations, O’Brien explores how these narratives inculcated the myth of Indian extinction, a myth that has stubbornly remained in the American consciousness. In order to convince themselves that the Indians had vanished despite their continued presence, O’Brien finds that local historians and their readers embraced notions of racial purity rooted in the century’s scientific racism and saw living Indians as “mixed” and therefore no longer truly Indian. Adaptation to modern life on the part of Indian peoples was used as further evidence of their demise. Indians did not—and have not—accepted this effacement, and O’Brien details how Indians have resisted their erasure through narratives of their own. These debates and the rich and surprising history uncovered in O’Brien’s work continue to have a profound influence on discourses about race and indigenous rights.


American Indian Nations

Filename: american-indian-nations.pdf
ISBN: 9780759113695
Release Date: 2007-08-13
Number of pages: 334
Author: George Horse Capture
Publisher: Rowman Altamira

Download and read online American Indian Nations in PDF and EPUB American Indian Nations takes stock of Indian history, policy, and culture over the past 30 years. A distinctive contribution to the understanding and interpretation of current Indian affairs, policies, and community development, this dynamic commentary of contemporary issues brings together a Who's Who of tribal leaders, scholars, and activists. No other collection offers such a thought-provoking and utterly current series of essays on the problems and achievements of modern Native peoples.


Plucked

Filename: plucked.pdf
ISBN: 9781479840823
Release Date: 2015-01-16
Number of pages: 280
Author: Rebecca M. Herzig
Publisher: NYU Press

Download and read online Plucked in PDF and EPUB A cultural historian explores the history of Americans' changing attitudes towards hair removal, discussing how it was once viewed as a “mutilation” practiced by “savage” men to being expected of women, lest they be viewed as mentally ill or sexually deviant.


Indian nations

Filename: indian-nations.pdf
ISBN: UVA:X004603797
Release Date: 2002-11-01
Number of pages: 108
Author: Danny Lyon
Publisher: Twin Palms Pub

Download and read online Indian nations in PDF and EPUB Danny Lyon has again taken his camera to an America unknown to most of us, and by doing so he has again helped define who we are. Spending four years visiting the Sioux, Apache, and Western tribes, he has returned with haunting pictures of the plains and desert, and portraits that are both very real, and very romantic. This is Danny Lyon's first major serial documentary since Conversations with the Dead. It is a form that he pioneered and that he is a master of. The pictures and captions lead us through the roundup and containment of the first Americans on the reservations where they reside today. The work captures a people and a sad beauty that is at the core of our history and our country. The introduction is by Pulitzer prize winner Larry McMurtry. (All royalties from Indian Nations will be used to establish a photography program at the Native American Preparatory School in Rowe, New Mexico)


500 Nations

Filename: 500-nations.pdf
ISBN: 1844138267
Release Date: 2005-02
Number of pages: 468
Author: Alvin M. Josephy
Publisher: Pimlico

Download and read online 500 Nations in PDF and EPUB This is the stirring, epic story of the hundreds of Indian nations that have inhabited North America for more than 15,000 years and of their centuries-long struggle with the Europeans. It is a story of friendship, treachery, courage and war, beginning when Columbus disembarked at Hispaniola among the Arawaks in 1492, and comes to a climax when the last groups of Sioux were moved onto a reservation following the massacre at Wounded Knee in 1890.We meet men and women, heroes and villains through their own words, their lives recreated from memory, memoir, and ancient documents: Massasoit, whose greeting to the Mayflower pilgrims - 'Welcome, Englishmen' - was given in their own language; Pocahontas, whose father's intervention on behalf of John Smith ironically changed the course of her life; Deganawida, known as the Peace Maker, whose Great Law laid the foundation for the confederacy among the five nations of the Iroquois, which in turn may have influenced the colonists' fledging efforts at confederation; Sequoyah, inventor of the Cherokee alphabet; Tecumseh, the charismatic Shawnee leader; Satanta, who led the Kiowa resistance; Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce; Cochise and Geronimo of the Apaches; Red Cloud, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse of the Sioux...Written by the celebrated historian Alvin M. Josephy, Jr., lavishly illustrated with nearly 500 paintings, woodcuts, drawings, photographs, and Indian artifacts, this thrilling and beautiful book shows us the many worlds of North America's Indians, as we have never seen them before.


Indian Country

Filename: indian-country.pdf
ISBN: 9781554588107
Release Date: 2009-08-03
Number of pages: 304
Author: Gail Guthrie Valaskakis
Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

Download and read online Indian Country in PDF and EPUB Since first contact, Natives and newcomers have been involved in an increasingly complex struggle over power and identity. Modern “Indian wars” are fought over land and treaty rights, artistic appropriation, and academic analysis, while Native communities struggle among themselves over membership, money, and cultural meaning. In cultural and political arenas across North America, Natives enact and newcomers protest issues of traditionalism, sovereignty, and self-determination. In these struggles over domination and resistance, over different ideologies and Indian identities, neither Natives nor other North Americans recognize the significance of being rooted together in history and culture, or how representations of “Indianness” set them in opposition to each other. In Indian Country: Essays on Contemporary Native Culture, Gail Guthrie Valaskakis uses a cultural studies approach to offer a unique perspective on Native political struggle and cultural conflict in both Canada and the United States. She reflects on treaty rights and traditionalism, media warriors, Indian princesses, powwow, museums, art, and nationhood. According to Valaskakis, Native and non-Native people construct both who they are and their relations with each other in narratives that circulate through art, anthropological method, cultural appropriation, and Native reappropriation. For Native peoples and Others, untangling the past—personal, political, and cultural—can help to make sense of current struggles over power and identity that define the Native experience today. Grounded in theory and threaded with Native voices and evocative descriptions of “Indian” experience (including the author’s), the essays interweave historical and political process, personal narrative, and cultural critique. This book is an important contribution to Native studies that will appeal to anyone interested in First Nations’ experience and popular culture.


American Indian Politics and the American Political System

Filename: american-indian-politics-and-the-american-political-system.pdf
ISBN: 9781442203877
Release Date: 2011
Number of pages: 339
Author: David Eugene Wilkins
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

Download and read online American Indian Politics and the American Political System in PDF and EPUB ""This book is a lively and accessible account of the remarkably complex legal and political situation of American Indian tribes and tribal citizens (who are also U.S. citizens) David E. Wilkins and Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark have provided the g̀o-to' source for a clear yet detailed and sophisticated introduction to tribal soverignty and federal Indian policy. It is a valuable resource both for readers unfamiliar with the subject matter and for readers in Native American studies and related fields, who will appreciate the insightful and original scholarly analysis of the authors."--Thomas Biolsi, University of California at Berkeley" ""American Indian Politics and the American Political System is simply an indispensable compendium of fact and reason on the historical and modern landscape of American Indian law and policy. No teacher or student of American Indian studies, no policymaker in American Indian policy, and no observer of American Indian history and law should do without this book. There is nothing in the field remotely as comprehensive, usable, and balanced as Wilkins and Stark's work."--Matthew L. M. Fletcher, director of the Indigenous Law and Policy Center at Michigan State University College of Law" ""Wilkins has written the first general study of contemporary Indians in the United States from the disciplinary standpoint of political science. His inclusion of legal matters results in sophisticated treatment of many contemporary issues involving Native American governments and the government of the United States and gives readers a good background for understanding other questions. The writing is clear-not a minor matter in such a complex subject--and short case histories are presented, plus links (including websites) to many sources of information."--Choice


Crooked Paths to Allotment

Filename: crooked-paths-to-allotment.pdf
ISBN: 9780807837412
Release Date: 2012-10-22
Number of pages: 248
Author: C. Joseph Genetin-Pilawa
Publisher: UNC Press Books

Download and read online Crooked Paths to Allotment in PDF and EPUB Standard narratives of Native American history view the nineteenth century in terms of steadily declining Indigenous sovereignty, from removal of southeastern tribes to the 1887 General Allotment Act. In Crooked Paths to Allotment, C. Joseph Genetin-Pilawa complicates these narratives, focusing on political moments when viable alternatives to federal assimilation policies arose. In these moments, Native American reformers and their white allies challenged coercive practices and offered visions for policies that might have allowed Indigenous nations to adapt at their own pace and on their own terms. Examining the contests over Indian policy from Reconstruction through the Gilded Age, Genetin-Pilawa reveals the contingent state of American settler colonialism. Genetin-Pilawa focuses on reformers and activists, including Tonawanda Seneca Ely S. Parker and Council Fire editor Thomas A. Bland, whose contributions to Indian policy debates have heretofore been underappreciated. He reveals how these men and their allies opposed such policies as forced land allotment, the elimination of traditional cultural practices, mandatory boarding school education for Indian youth, and compulsory participation in the market economy. Although the mainstream supporters of assimilation successfully repressed these efforts, the ideas and policy frameworks they espoused established a tradition of dissent against disruptive colonial governance.


Blood Struggle

Filename: blood-struggle.pdf
ISBN: 0393051498
Release Date: 2005-01
Number of pages: 543
Author: Charles F. Wilkinson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

Download and read online Blood Struggle in PDF and EPUB "The story of the extraordinary gains by Indian tribes over the second half of the twentieth century"--Provided by publisher.


Agamben and Colonialism

Filename: agamben-and-colonialism.pdf
ISBN: 9780748649266
Release Date: 2012-05-11
Number of pages: 304
Author: Marcelo Svirsky
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

Download and read online Agamben and Colonialism in PDF and EPUB 12 new essays evaluating Agamben's work from a postcolonial perspective. Svirsky and Bignall assemble leading figures to explore the rich philosophical linkages and the political concerns shared by Agamben and postcolonial theory.Agamben's theories of the 'state of exception' and 'bare life' are situated in critical relation to the existence of these phenomena in the colonial/postcolonial world.


Tribal Fantasies

Filename: tribal-fantasies.pdf
ISBN: 9781137318817
Release Date: 2012-12-28
Number of pages: 265
Author: J. Mackay
Publisher: Springer

Download and read online Tribal Fantasies in PDF and EPUB Contributors argue that the last hundred years have seen the way Europe imagines Natives shifting from exoticism to outright fantasy, mirroring the changing European perception of America itself.